Intubation-Related Dysphonia Following Extreme Preterm Birth: Case Studies in Behavioural Voice Intervention Many more children than ever before survive and thrive following preterm birth (Saigal & Doyle, 2008). To date, research has focussed on medical, developmental, neurological, and behavioral outcomes. As the number of surviving children increases and survivors reach school age and beyond, it has become apparent that many children experience ... Article
Article  |   November 01, 2014
Intubation-Related Dysphonia Following Extreme Preterm Birth: Case Studies in Behavioural Voice Intervention
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Victoria Reynolds
    School of Paediatrics and Child Health, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia
    Speech Pathology Department, Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Subiaco, Western Australia
  • Suzanne Meldrum
    Speech Pathology Department, Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Subiaco, Western Australia
    School of Psychology and Social Science, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Western Australia
  • Karen Simmer
    School of Paediatrics and Child Health, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia
    Department of Neonatal Paediatrics, King Edward Memorial Hospital and Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Subiaco, Western Australia
    Centre for Neonatal Research and Education, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia
  • Shyan Vijayasekaran
    Department of Otolaryngology and Head and Neck Surgery, Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Subiaco, Western Australia
    Schools of Surgery and Paediatrics and Child Health, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia
  • Noel French
    Department of Neonatal Paediatrics, King Edward Memorial Hospital and Princess Margaret Hospital for Children, Subiaco, Western Australia
    Centre for Neonatal Research and Education, University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia
    State Child Development Centre, Health Department of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia
  • Victoria Reynolds

    Disclosure: Financial: Victoria Reynolds, Suzanne Meldrum, Karen Simmer, Shyan Vijayasekaran, and Noel French have no financial interests to disclose.

    Nonfinancial: Victoria Reynolds, Suzanne Meldrum, Karen Simmer, Shyan Vijayasekaran, and Noel French have no nonfinancial interests to disclose.

Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Articles
Article   |   November 01, 2014
Intubation-Related Dysphonia Following Extreme Preterm Birth: Case Studies in Behavioural Voice Intervention
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, November 2014, Vol. 24, 124-129. doi:10.1044/vvd24.3.124
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, November 2014, Vol. 24, 124-129. doi:10.1044/vvd24.3.124

Many more children than ever before survive and thrive following preterm birth (Saigal & Doyle, 2008). To date, research has focussed on medical, developmental, neurological, and behavioral outcomes. As the number of surviving children increases and survivors reach school age and beyond, it has become apparent that many children experience difficulties with voice production (French et al., 2013). Following preterm birth, endotracheal intubation may be necessary to deliver surfactant or relieve respiratory distress during the neonatal period (Ho, Subramaniam, Henderson-Smart, & Davis, 2002). Intubation injury to the larynx and resultant dysphonia are well described in the literature (Bray, Cavalli, Eze, Mills, & Hartley, 2010). This article presents a brief review of the literature relevant to intubation-related injury following preterm birth and 2 case studies of voice outcomes following a trial of behavioral voice therapy in extremely preterm children who were intubated.

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