Integrated Implicit-Explicit Learning Approach to Voice Therapy This article is intended to define, compare, and provide outcomes for an integrated implicit-explicit learning approach to voice therapy related to current motor learning theories. Clients from the Misericordia University voice clinic have undergone therapy using this integrated approach. The article will review previous literature on motor learning theories related ... Article
Article  |   November 01, 2014
Integrated Implicit-Explicit Learning Approach to Voice Therapy
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Cari M. Tellis
    Speech-Language Pathology Department, Misericordia University, Dallas, PA
  • Cari M. Tellis

    Disclosure: Financial: Cari M. Tellis has no financial interests to disclose.

    Nonfinancial: Aspects of this manuscript have been presented at the American Speech-Language Hearing Association Conference.

Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   November 01, 2014
Integrated Implicit-Explicit Learning Approach to Voice Therapy
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, November 2014, Vol. 24, 111-118. doi:10.1044/vvd24.3.111
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, November 2014, Vol. 24, 111-118. doi:10.1044/vvd24.3.111

This article is intended to define, compare, and provide outcomes for an integrated implicit-explicit learning approach to voice therapy related to current motor learning theories.

Clients from the Misericordia University voice clinic have undergone therapy using this integrated approach. The article will review previous literature on motor learning theories related to voice, define the protocol used in the integrated approach, and highlight the diagnostic, clinical outcomes exhibited by these clients. Steps for the therapy protocol will be highlighted. Results indicate that individuals participating in an integrated implicit-explicit learning approach to voice therapy report that initial instruction and target production take increased effort to learn; however once acquired, targets are easily generalized to more complex speaking (e.g., conversation) tasks. Implicit-only voice therapy approaches are effective in treating voice disorders. Limited published data, however, has compared traditional, implicit-only therapy to other methods of voice therapy. Another approach may be one that employs more explicit teaching of the mechanics of voice production. The integrated implicit-explicit learning approach discussed in this article combines explicit instruction with implicit facilitators, and initiates simple and complex tasks from the start of therapy.

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