Behavioral Management of Paradoxical Vocal Fold Motion Paradoxical vocal fold motion (PVFM), or vocal cord dysfunction (VCD), is a non-organic, behavioral, upper airway disorder primarily characterized by adduction of the true vocal folds during respiration. Recognition of this condition is becoming more prevalent amongst physicians, resulting in an increased number of referrals to speech-language pathologists (SLPs) for ... Article
Article  |   July 01, 2014
Behavioral Management of Paradoxical Vocal Fold Motion
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jennifer R. Reitz
    The Blaine Block Institute for Voice Analysis & Rehabilitation, Dayton, OH
    The Professional Voice Center of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH
  • Stephen Gorman
    The Blaine Block Institute for Voice Analysis & Rehabilitation, Dayton, OH
    The Professional Voice Center of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH
  • Jennifer Kegyes
    The Blaine Block Institute for Voice Analysis & Rehabilitation, Dayton, OH
    The Professional Voice Center of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH
  • Disclosure: Financial: Jennifer R. Reitz, Stephen Gorman, and Jennifer Kegyes have no financial interests to disclose.
    Disclosure: Financial: Jennifer R. Reitz, Stephen Gorman, and Jennifer Kegyes have no financial interests to disclose.×
  • Nonfinancial: Jennifer R. Reitz, Stephen Gorman, and Jennifer Kegyes have no nonfinancial interests to disclose.
    Nonfinancial: Jennifer R. Reitz, Stephen Gorman, and Jennifer Kegyes have no nonfinancial interests to disclose.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Articles
Article   |   July 01, 2014
Behavioral Management of Paradoxical Vocal Fold Motion
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, July 2014, Vol. 24, 64-70. doi:10.1044/vvd24.2.64
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, July 2014, Vol. 24, 64-70. doi:10.1044/vvd24.2.64

Paradoxical vocal fold motion (PVFM), or vocal cord dysfunction (VCD), is a non-organic, behavioral, upper airway disorder primarily characterized by adduction of the true vocal folds during respiration. Recognition of this condition is becoming more prevalent amongst physicians, resulting in an increased number of referrals to speech-language pathologists (SLPs) for assessment and treatment. Diagnosis of PVFM requires a multidisciplinary approach. Treatment for PVFM is also multi-factorial, but is primarily designed to train abduction of the vocal folds during the breathing cycle, allowing easy movement of breath to and from the lungs without laryngeal constriction. Behavioral management is the preferred and most common approach to treatment and may include relaxed throat breathing and laryngeal control exercises during trigger-specific training.

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