Coordinator's Corner Violinist Mischa Elman and his wife were leaving Carnegie Hall one day after a rehearsal that hadn't pleased him. They were by the backstage entrance when they were approached by two tourists looking for the hall's entrance. Seeing his violin case, they asked, “How do you get to Carnegie ... Coordinator's Column
Coordinator's Column  |   July 01, 2014
Coordinator's Corner
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Coordinator's Column
Coordinator's Column   |   July 01, 2014
Coordinator's Corner
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, July 2014, Vol. 24, 54. doi:10.1044/vvd24.2.54
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, July 2014, Vol. 24, 54. doi:10.1044/vvd24.2.54
Violinist Mischa Elman and his wife were leaving Carnegie Hall one day after a rehearsal that hadn't pleased him. They were by the backstage entrance when they were approached by two tourists looking for the hall's entrance. Seeing his violin case, they asked, “How do you get to Carnegie Hall?” Without looking up and continuing on his way, Elman simply replied, “Practice.”
This classic joke has been on my mind for some time now, in part because I'm scheduled to sing at Carnegie Hall with the Atlanta Symphony the day after tomorrow. Performing in this venue is a watershed moment for any musician, and one that signifies a degree of achievement in one's artistic endeavors. Since singing and voice therapy have become so intertwined for many of us, I began to wonder whether there was a similar “made it” moment for speech-language pathologists specializing in voice work.
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