An Example of the Role of Basic Science Research to Inform the Treatment of Unilateral Vocal Fold Paralysis An alternative and complementary approach to randomized trials or other clinical research in unilateral vocal fold paralysis is to use basic science research in animal models to answer the following two questions: (1) how and why do asymmetries affect voice production?, and (2) how do various surgical procedures affect these ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2014
An Example of the Role of Basic Science Research to Inform the Treatment of Unilateral Vocal Fold Paralysis
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sid Khosla
    Department of Otolaryngology/Head & Neck Surgery, University of Cincinnati School of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH
  • Liran Oren
    Department of Otolaryngology/Head & Neck Surgery, University of Cincinnati School of Medicine, Cincinnati, OH
  • Ephraim Gutmark
    Department of Aerospace Engineering and Engineering Mechanics, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH
  • Disclosures: Financial: Sid Khosla, Liran Oren, and Ephraim Gutmark received funding support from the National Institutes of Health. Sid Khosla is an Associate Professor at the University of Cincinnati. Liran Oren is a research assistant professor in the department of otolaryngology at the University of Cincinnati.
    Disclosures: Financial: Sid Khosla, Liran Oren, and Ephraim Gutmark received funding support from the National Institutes of Health. Sid Khosla is an Associate Professor at the University of Cincinnati. Liran Oren is a research assistant professor in the department of otolaryngology at the University of Cincinnati.×
  • Nonfinancial: Sid Khosla has published in this area, and several publications are listed in the references. Liran Oren has previously published in this subject area. Some of these publications are referenced in the text.
    Nonfinancial: Sid Khosla has published in this area, and several publications are listed in the references. Liran Oren has previously published in this subject area. Some of these publications are referenced in the text.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   March 01, 2014
An Example of the Role of Basic Science Research to Inform the Treatment of Unilateral Vocal Fold Paralysis
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, March 2014, Vol. 24, 37-50. doi:10.1044/vvd24.1.37
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, March 2014, Vol. 24, 37-50. doi:10.1044/vvd24.1.37

An alternative and complementary approach to randomized trials or other clinical research in unilateral vocal fold paralysis is to use basic science research in animal models to answer the following two questions: (1) how and why do asymmetries affect voice production?, and (2) how do various surgical procedures affect these asymmetries? In this article, we will discuss some of our approaches to the first question. All experiments discussed center around the presence and effects of vortices, or areas of rotational motion, between the folds due to a phenomenon known as flow separation. Therefore, the formation and properties of intraglottal flow separation vortices will be briefly discussed. Then, we will describe experiments that look at the effects of the flow separation vortices on three measures of laryngeal physiology important to voice production: flow skewing, acoustic intensity, and glottal efficiency. Finally, we will explore the effects of some asymmetries on the flow separation vortices and discuss implications for the treatment of unilateral vocal fold paralysis. Our work is early and has some clear limitations. Therefore, the goal of this article is not to fully answer any question, but to show an example of the type of information that can be addressed by research in excised canine larynges.

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