Perioperative Voice Recovery and the Vocal Folds: Perspectives From the Voice Care Team Information regarding the significance of wound healing in laryngology is steadily increasing. Vocal fold tissue may be injured by phonotrauma (excessive impact from the opposing vocal fold), chemical agents (e.g., stomach acid), trauma, or iatrogenic causes (i.e., intubation, vocal fold surgery). Following injury, the affected area becomes inflamed. The body ... Article
Article  |   July 01, 2013
Perioperative Voice Recovery and the Vocal Folds: Perspectives From the Voice Care Team
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Portone-Maira Carissa
    Department of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery, The Emory Voice Center, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA
  • M. Johns Michael, III
    Department of Otolaryngology — Head and Neck Surgery, The Emory Voice Center, Emory University School of Medicine, Atlanta, GA
  • Disclosure: Carissa Portone-Maira and Michael M. Johns, III, have no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Carissa Portone-Maira and Michael M. Johns, III, have no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   July 01, 2013
Perioperative Voice Recovery and the Vocal Folds: Perspectives From the Voice Care Team
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, July 2013, Vol. 23, 53-60. doi:10.1044/vvd23.2.53
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, July 2013, Vol. 23, 53-60. doi:10.1044/vvd23.2.53

Information regarding the significance of wound healing in laryngology is steadily increasing. Vocal fold tissue may be injured by phonotrauma (excessive impact from the opposing vocal fold), chemical agents (e.g., stomach acid), trauma, or iatrogenic causes (i.e., intubation, vocal fold surgery). Following injury, the affected area becomes inflamed. The body initiates cell proliferation and matrix deposition to begin the process of healing. Matrix remodeling during the healing process determines the degree of scar formation. Vocal fold scar has well-documented structural and functional consequences, and is notoriously difficult to manage (Hirano, 2005). Our roles as vocal professionals in relationship to the stages of wound healing change at key time points: before creating a wound, when making a wound, acute management (0–2 weeks), subacute management (2–8 weeks), and late management (8 weeks and beyond)..

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