Coordinator's Column By the time you receive our first issue of Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders for 2012, we will have completed the first quarter of the new year. As I write this column, the year has just begun and I am always in a reminiscing mood at the beginning ... Coordinator's Column
Coordinator's Column  |   March 01, 2012
Coordinator's Column
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Coordinator's Column
Coordinator's Column   |   March 01, 2012
Coordinator's Column
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, March 2012, Vol. 22, 2-3. doi:10.1044/vvd22.1.2
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, March 2012, Vol. 22, 2-3. doi:10.1044/vvd22.1.2
By the time you receive our first issue of Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders for 2012, we will have completed the first quarter of the new year. As I write this column, the year has just begun and I am always in a reminiscing mood at the beginning of the year. We should take a moment to reminisce about 2011.
If you remember, we started the year off with a bang, a bang on the head, to be specific, when Medicare announced on January 3, 2011 that speech-language pathologists (SLPs) performing videostroboscopy and nasoendoscopy were required to be fully supervised by a physician in the room during examinations, retroactively effective January 1. That announcement sent SLPs into a frenzy, it threatened to change the way many multidisciplinary centers worked and could have shut down other single-discipline centers. The Special Interest Group (SIG) 3 Reimbursement Committee wasted no time answering the numerous e-mails that came flying in. Our SIG became the go-to resource for other SIGs and for otolaryngologists (ENTs) alike. ASHA staff and representatives from the Healthcare Economics Committee (HCEC) jumped into action to collaborate with the American Academy of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery (AAO-HNS). Staff from both associations and their member experts met with medical directors at the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) to advocate for changing the policy from “personal” supervision to “direct” supervision (i.e., physician available in the office suite). Ultimately, the decision was reversed and all supervision was removed from the requirements. As of October 1, 2011, SLPs can perform videostroboscopy and nasopharyngoscopy without onsite physician supervision.
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