Extra-Esophageal Reflux and Laryngeal Disease: Update From a Translational Research Team Extraesophageal reflux (EER) has been implicated in a variety of different otorhinolaryngologic disorders including otitis media, chronic sinusitis, globus pharyngeus, laryngeal neoplasia, and many benign laryngeal disorders. New technologies such as multichannel intraluminal impedance studies have revolutionized our ability to detect the prevalence of EER, and the role of biomarker ... Article
Article  |   November 01, 2011
Extra-Esophageal Reflux and Laryngeal Disease: Update From a Translational Research Team
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jonathan M. Bock
    Department of Otolaryngology & Communication Sciences, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI
  • Nikki Johnston
    Department of Otolaryngology & Communication Sciences, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI
  • Robert J. Toohill
    Department of Otolaryngology & Communication Sciences, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI
  • Ian J. Koszewski
    Department of Otolaryngology & Communication Sciences, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI
  • Tina L. Samuels
    Department of Otolaryngology & Communication Sciences, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI
  • Joel H. Blumin
    Department of Otolaryngology & Communication Sciences, Medical College of Wisconsin, Milwaukee, WI
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Articles
Article   |   November 01, 2011
Extra-Esophageal Reflux and Laryngeal Disease: Update From a Translational Research Team
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, November 2011, Vol. 21, 118-123. doi:10.1044/vvd21.3.118
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, November 2011, Vol. 21, 118-123. doi:10.1044/vvd21.3.118

Extraesophageal reflux (EER) has been implicated in a variety of different otorhinolaryngologic disorders including otitis media, chronic sinusitis, globus pharyngeus, laryngeal neoplasia, and many benign laryngeal disorders. New technologies such as multichannel intraluminal impedance studies have revolutionized our ability to detect the prevalence of EER, and the role of biomarker detection in diagnosing ongoing EER is evolving. Gastric refluxate contains not only hydrochloric acid, but also bile salts and digestive enzymes such as pepsin. Analysis of pepsin levels in both tissues and secretions is emerging as a useful adjunct in the diagnosis of EER and work to evaluate the role of pepsin in the promotion of laryngeal inflammation and neoplasia is ongoing. This review discusses the recent literature regarding the diagnosis and treatment of EER, and describes the controversies that can perhaps be further elucidated by ongoing clinical and translational research.

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