Ambulatory Monitoring of Daily Voice Use Many common voice disorders are chronic or recurring conditions likely to result from faulty and/or abusive patterns of vocal behavior. Such behaviorally based disorders can be difficult to assess accurately in the clinical setting and potentially could be much better characterized by long-term ambulatory monitoring of vocal function as individuals ... Article
Article  |   July 01, 2011
Ambulatory Monitoring of Daily Voice Use
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Robert E. Hillman
    Center for Laryngeal Surgery and Voice Rehabilitation, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA
    Communication Sciences and Disorders, MGH Institute of Health Professions, and Surgery and Health Sciences and Technology, Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, MA
  • Daryush D. Mehta
    Center for Laryngeal Surgery and Voice Rehabilitation, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA
  • Commercial Disclosure
    Commercial Disclosure×
    Dr. Hillman has a financial interest in the APM based on a contractual agreement between Sensimetrics, Inc. (R&D for the initial version of the APM) and KayPENTAX, Inc. (manufacturer of the APM).
    Dr. Hillman has a financial interest in the APM based on a contractual agreement between Sensimetrics, Inc. (R&D for the initial version of the APM) and KayPENTAX, Inc. (manufacturer of the APM).×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   July 01, 2011
Ambulatory Monitoring of Daily Voice Use
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, July 2011, Vol. 21, 56-61. doi:10.1044/vvd21.2.56
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, July 2011, Vol. 21, 56-61. doi:10.1044/vvd21.2.56

Many common voice disorders are chronic or recurring conditions likely to result from faulty and/or abusive patterns of vocal behavior. Such behaviorally based disorders can be difficult to assess accurately in the clinical setting and potentially could be much better characterized by long-term ambulatory monitoring of vocal function as individuals engage in their typical daily activities. Ambulatory monitoring also could provide new insight into the actual role of voice use in common disorders and missing quantitative data on what constitutes normal levels of daily voice use for different groups of individuals, activities, and occupations. This report describes the motivation, previous development efforts, current state-of-the-art technology, and future directions in ambulatory monitoring of voice use.

Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.