Using Popular Mobile Devices in Voice Therapy Mobile tools are increasingly available to help individuals monitor their progress toward health behavior goals. Commonly known commercial products for health and fitness self-monitoring include wearable devices such as the Fitbit© and Nike + Pedometer© that work independently or in conjunction with mobile platforms (e.g., smartphones, media players) as well as web-based ... Article
Article  |   November 01, 2013
Using Popular Mobile Devices in Voice Therapy
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Eva van Leer
    Department of Education Psychology and Special Education, Georgia State University, Atlanta, GA
  • Disclosure: Financial: This paper examines a variety of data, including some research by the author funded by the National Institutes for Health.
    Disclosure: Financial: This paper examines a variety of data, including some research by the author funded by the National Institutes for Health.×
  • Nonfinancial: Eva van Leer has written a number of papers on this topic, a few of which are referenced in this paper.
    Nonfinancial: Eva van Leer has written a number of papers on this topic, a few of which are referenced in this paper.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   November 01, 2013
Using Popular Mobile Devices in Voice Therapy
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, November 2013, Vol. 23, 82-87. doi:10.1044/vvd23.3.82
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, November 2013, Vol. 23, 82-87. doi:10.1044/vvd23.3.82

Mobile tools are increasingly available to help individuals monitor their progress toward health behavior goals. Commonly known commercial products for health and fitness self-monitoring include wearable devices such as the Fitbit© and Nike + Pedometer© that work independently or in conjunction with mobile platforms (e.g., smartphones, media players) as well as web-based interfaces. These tools track and graph exercise behavior, provide motivational messages, offer health-related information, and allow users to share their accomplishments via social media. Approximately 2 million software programs or “apps” have been designed for mobile platforms (Pure Oxygen Mobile, 2013), many of which are health-related. The development of mobile health devices and applications is advancing so quickly that the Food and Drug Administration issued a Guidance statement with the purpose of defining mobile medical applications and describing a tailored approach to their regulation.

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