Laryngeal Laser Surgery for Recurrent Respiratory Papillomatosis, Cancer and Dysplasia: Operating Room and Office Since their introduction in laryngology over 30 years ago, lasers have facilitated critically-important innovations that have now evolved into office-based surgery. Recent advances include the application of angiolytic lasers that treat vocal fold lesions by ablating vasculature and the use of the thulium laser as a more efficient and versatile ... Article
Article  |   July 01, 2009
Laryngeal Laser Surgery for Recurrent Respiratory Papillomatosis, Cancer and Dysplasia: Operating Room and Office
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Steven M. Zeitels, MD
    Center for Laryngeal Surgery and Voice Rehabilitation, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA
    Department of Laryngeal Surgery, Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, MA
  • Robert E. Hillman
    Center for Laryngeal Surgery and Voice Rehabilitation, Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA
    Surgery and Health Sciences and Technology, Harvard Medical School, Cambridge, MA
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Healthcare Settings / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   July 01, 2009
Laryngeal Laser Surgery for Recurrent Respiratory Papillomatosis, Cancer and Dysplasia: Operating Room and Office
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, July 2009, Vol. 19, 74-83. doi:10.1044/vvd19.2.74
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, July 2009, Vol. 19, 74-83. doi:10.1044/vvd19.2.74
Abstract

Since their introduction in laryngology over 30 years ago, lasers have facilitated critically-important innovations that have now evolved into office-based surgery. Recent advances include the application of angiolytic lasers that treat vocal fold lesions by ablating vasculature and the use of the thulium laser as a more efficient and versatile tissue dissector. In our experience, the 532nm pulsed KTP laser has emerged thus far as the optimal angiolytic laser to treat vocal-fold lesions both in the operating room and in the clinic setting. Despite the fact that the skill-sets to adopt office-based laser treatment are an easy transition for most laryngological surgeons, the primary impediment to widespread adoption is the cost of the technology. Furthermore, critical development of these new lasers will occur with broader use of these lasers in other surgical disciplines, which should diminish costs for all surgeons and thereby promote better outcomes for individuals with voice disorders.

Acknowledgments
The authors have received the following instrumentation: 585nm pulsed-dye laser (Pentax) 532nm pulsed KTP laser (Laserscope), Thulium laser (Lisa Laser). No research funding support or consulting income was received from these companies. This work was supported in part by the Institute of Laryngology & Voice Restoration and the Eugene B. Casey Foundation.
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