Behavioral Management of Unilateral Vocal Fold Paralysis and Paresis Purpose: In this article, I will summarize the process of selecting appropriate voice therapy candidates and relevant treatment techniques for patients with unilateral vocal fold paralysis or paresis. Methods: I will present a review of the literature and pertinent clinical experience while laying out diagnostic tools, considerations for choosing voice ... Article
Article  |   November 01, 2012
Behavioral Management of Unilateral Vocal Fold Paralysis and Paresis
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sarah L. Schneider
    UCSF Voice and Swallowing Center, Division of Laryngology, Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, University of California San Francisco, San Francisco, California
  • Disclosure: Sarah L. Schneider has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.
    Disclosure: Sarah L. Schneider has no financial or nonfinancial relationships related to the content of this article.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   November 01, 2012
Behavioral Management of Unilateral Vocal Fold Paralysis and Paresis
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, November 2012, Vol. 22, 112-120. doi:10.1044/vvd22.3.112
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, November 2012, Vol. 22, 112-120. doi:10.1044/vvd22.3.112

Purpose: In this article, I will summarize the process of selecting appropriate voice therapy candidates and relevant treatment techniques for patients with unilateral vocal fold paralysis or paresis.

Methods: I will present a review of the literature and pertinent clinical experience while laying out diagnostic tools, considerations for choosing voice therapy candidates, and specific therapy techniques that clinicians may employ. In addition, I highlight how these decisions are guided by a thorough behavioral diagnostic voice evaluation.

Results: There are a number of publications in the literature that discuss the role of voice therapy and the types of voice therapy techniques commonly used in treating vocal fold motion impairment. However, little efficacy data exist about the utility of voice therapy alone in this population.

Conclusions: Behavioral management of patients with vocal fold paralysis and paresis is widely accepted as part of the treatment process. With little efficacy data to support outcomes for specific voice therapy techniques alone with this patient population, we must continue to rely primarily on our clinical experience and outcomes from other populations to guide the therapeutic process.

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