Hands-Free Cough and Speech in Long-Term Tube-Free Tracheostomy A surgical technique developed by Dr. Isaac Eliachar in the Section of Laryngotracheal Reconstruction, Cleveland Clinic Department of Otolaryngology, dramatically improves quality of life in patients who require a long-term tracheostoma. This procedure, called “long-term tube-free tracheostomy” (LTTFT), creates a self-sustaining tracheostoma that requires no tracheotomy tubes to maintain patency. ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2009
Hands-Free Cough and Speech in Long-Term Tube-Free Tracheostomy
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Claudio Milstein
    Head and Neck Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH
  • Lee M. Akst, MD
    Department of Otolaryngology, Loyola University, Chicago, IL
  • Isaac Eliachar, MD (retired)
    Head and Neck Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Articles
Article   |   March 01, 2009
Hands-Free Cough and Speech in Long-Term Tube-Free Tracheostomy
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, March 2009, Vol. 19, 34-42. doi:10.1044/vvd19.1.34
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, March 2009, Vol. 19, 34-42. doi:10.1044/vvd19.1.34
Abstract

A surgical technique developed by Dr. Isaac Eliachar in the Section of Laryngotracheal Reconstruction, Cleveland Clinic Department of Otolaryngology, dramatically improves quality of life in patients who require a long-term tracheostoma. This procedure, called “long-term tube-free tracheostomy” (LTTFT), creates a self-sustaining tracheostoma that requires no tracheotomy tubes to maintain patency. The advantages of a tube-free procedure are numerous, and the improvements in quality of life of patients who have successfully undergone this operation are readily noticeable. These benefits include (a) removal of tracheal appliances, such as tracheal tubes, valves, vents, and stents; (b) prevention of tissue damage associated with appliances and a decrease in tissue irritation and formation of granulation tissue; (c) better secretion management, elimination of frequent clogging of tracheal appliances, and need for suction; (d) prevention of aspiration; (e) retention or re-establishment of the functions of sniffing and smelling; and (f) performance of hands-free cough and speech production due to the self-constricting capabilities of the stoma. The purpose of this article is to present the concept of LTTFT as an alternative to standard tracheotomy in select patients. The difference between LTTFT as an alternative to tracheotomy and the impact these differences have upon medical decision-making will be emphasized.

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