Occupational Issues in Voice Problems Some professions put individuals at greater risk for voice problems than others. Effects may include a reduction in general quality of life and reduction in the ability to meet the demands of the workplace in particular. In this article, we review literature on occupational risk factors for voice problems, ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2003
Occupational Issues in Voice Problems
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Douglas Roth
    Communication Science and Disorders, University of Pittsburgh, University of Pittsburgh Voice Center
  • Katherine Verdolini
    Communication Science and Disorders, University of Pittsburgh, University of Pittsburgh Voice Center
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   March 01, 2003
Occupational Issues in Voice Problems
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, March 2003, Vol. 13, 8-14. doi:10.1044/vvd13.1.8
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, March 2003, Vol. 13, 8-14. doi:10.1044/vvd13.1.8
Some professions put individuals at greater risk for voice problems than others. Effects may include a reduction in general quality of life and reduction in the ability to meet the demands of the workplace in particular. In this article, we review literature on occupational risk factors for voice problems, impacts of voice problems in at-risk populations, and treatment options.
Voice problems may seem trivial in relation to many other health concerns. However, studies indicate that voice problems not only produce negative effects personally; such problems also produce negative effects in the work place and on society at large. One example is a study of 174 adults seeking treatment for voice problems (Smith, Gray, Dove, Kirchner, & Heras, 1997). The results indicated that 53% of treatment-seeking individuals reported moderate or worse effects of voice on previous work functioning. Forty-nine percent of respondents indicated moderate or worse current professional dysfunction due to voice, and 76% anticipated a moderate or worse negative impact of their voice problem on future work. Sixty-one percent reported moderate or worse negative professional self-esteem because of voice problems. Findings were contrasted with those from 173 non treatment-seeking individuals who did not experience the same effects anywhere near the same rate.
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