Editor's Corner Vocal fold stress in voice overuse and abuse is a fundamental topic in coursework on voice disorders and the basic premise of many intervention and treatment programs. There are multiple origins of misuse and abuse including talking too much, too loud and too high, talking during periods when the ... Editorial
Editorial  |   March 01, 2003
Editor's Corner
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Article Information
Editorial
Editorial   |   March 01, 2003
Editor's Corner
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, March 2003, Vol. 13, 3. doi:10.1044/vvd13.1.3
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, March 2003, Vol. 13, 3. doi:10.1044/vvd13.1.3
Vocal fold stress in voice overuse and abuse is a fundamental topic in coursework on voice disorders and the basic premise of many intervention and treatment programs. There are multiple origins of misuse and abuse including talking too much, too loud and too high, talking during periods when the larynx is edematous, inflamed or exhibits other tissue changes, and excessive coughing and throat clearing. The increased laryngeal demands placed by occupational or social needs often result in increased vocal fold stress, which, in turn, may result in a vocal fold pathology. For example, it has been well documented that school teachers are at greater risk for developing laryngeal pathologies. This is particularly the case with elementary school teachers who have excessive demands placed on them to talk longer, louder, and at higher pitch levels in order to communicate with their students. Similarly, cheerleaders, aerobics instructors, clergy, and professional voice users engage in vocal gymnastics that go beyond requirements for normal talking. Extended vocal activities often result in strained and excessive use that increases vocal fold stress and this, in turn, is thought to play a major etiological role in vocal fold damage. The mechanism of stress as it relates to vocal fold damage has recently been elucidated by in vitro and computer modeling to provide us a better understanding of the origins of laryngeal overuse and abuse disorders.
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