Allergy and the Invisible Invader Oftentimes, our patients tell us that their voice symptoms get worse when they are exposed to a particular environmental condition. The first example that comes to mind is the schoolteacher who works in a moldy classroom filled with old carpets and a historic ventilation system. Or, maybe it is ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2003
Allergy and the Invisible Invader
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Linda Kinney
    Ear, Nose and Throat and Plastic Surgery Associates, Winter Park, FL
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Articles
Article   |   March 01, 2003
Allergy and the Invisible Invader
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, March 2003, Vol. 13, 14-15. doi:10.1044/vvd13.1.14
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, March 2003, Vol. 13, 14-15. doi:10.1044/vvd13.1.14
Oftentimes, our patients tell us that their voice symptoms get worse when they are exposed to a particular environmental condition. The first example that comes to mind is the schoolteacher who works in a moldy classroom filled with old carpets and a historic ventilation system. Or, maybe it is the child who has recently moved down South and is adjusting to her exposure to new plants and airborne irritants. One other problem is with performers who often work in stages that are poorly cleaned with curtains that hold dust and mold.
The substance, which causes allergic reactions, is called allergens. An allergic reaction is the body’s response to a substance that many people can tolerate without difficulty. Allergy sufferers who are highly sensitive have symptoms every time they are exposed to an allergen. People who are only slightly sensitive require a higher concentration of allergens to provoke the same symptoms that occur in the highly allergic sufferers. The allergen load is the total exposure, at one time, to the allergens to which you are sensitive. The goal of allergen avoidance is to reduce your exposure, so that there will be a reduction in allergic symptoms and a decrease in the medication required to relieve these symptoms.
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