Relations Between the Voice and the Ear With Clinical Implications The ear and the vocal mechanism are closely tied. We develop our voice and speech skills with constant aural feedback by making on-line changes in our acoustic output based on our self-perceived acoustic output. The efficacy of the human voice in communicating messages and ideas to others is inevitably dependent ... Article
Article  |   November 01, 2010
Relations Between the Voice and the Ear With Clinical Implications
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Eric J. Hunter
    National Center for Voice and Speech, Division of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders and Department of Bioengineering, The University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT
  • Brian B. Monson
    National Center for Voice and Speech, Salt Lake City, UT
  • Doug W. Montequin
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Science, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   November 01, 2010
Relations Between the Voice and the Ear With Clinical Implications
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, November 2010, Vol. 20, 96-104. doi:10.1044/vvd20.3.96
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, November 2010, Vol. 20, 96-104. doi:10.1044/vvd20.3.96

The ear and the vocal mechanism are closely tied. We develop our voice and speech skills with constant aural feedback by making on-line changes in our acoustic output based on our self-perceived acoustic output. The efficacy of the human voice in communicating messages and ideas to others is inevitably dependent upon the human auditory system (of both the listener and the talker). Thus, a basic understanding of the relation of these two mechanisms is fundamental to an accurate assessment of potential vocal issues. The authors will review and discuss some of the relationships between the voice and the ear, the environmental factors that can affect aural feedback in a clinical setting, and the significance of this discussion to the speech-language pathologist.

Acknowledgment
This work was supported by grants R01-DC04347 and F31-DC010533 from the National Institutes of Health/National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders.
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