Reconstruction Techniques for the Treatment of Anatomical Upper Respiratory Tract Anomalies in Children Over the past 40 years, there has been a marked evolution in the presentation and management of pediatric laryngeal stenosis. Prior to 1965, this diagnosis indicated the presence of a congenital anterior glottic web or congenital subglottic stenosis. In many children, congenital subglottic stenosis could be anticipated to improve ... Article
Article  |   November 01, 2006
Reconstruction Techniques for the Treatment of Anatomical Upper Respiratory Tract Anomalies in Children
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ravindhra G. Elluru
    Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Division of Pediatric Otolaryngology Cincinnati, OH
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   November 01, 2006
Reconstruction Techniques for the Treatment of Anatomical Upper Respiratory Tract Anomalies in Children
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, November 2006, Vol. 16, 3-11. doi:10.1044/vvd16.3.3
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, November 2006, Vol. 16, 3-11. doi:10.1044/vvd16.3.3
Over the past 40 years, there has been a marked evolution in the presentation and management of pediatric laryngeal stenosis. Prior to 1965, this diagnosis indicated the presence of a congenital anterior glottic web or congenital subglottic stenosis. In many children, congenital subglottic stenosis could be anticipated to improve with time, even if placement of a temporary tracheotomy tube was required. The advent of prolonged intubation, particularly of the neonate, strikingly changed this situation. Acquired subglottic stenosis became and currently remains the most frequent cause of laryngeal stenosis. This condition is generally more severe than congenital subglottic stenosis and does not improve with time. Modern pediatric laryngeal reconstruction was thus born of necessity to manage these otherwise healthy children who depend on tracheotomies.
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