Pediatric Laryngotracheal Reconstruction: Case Studies As the survival rates of critically ill children and children born prematurely continue to increase due to advances in the medical field, the number of pediatric tracheotomies being performed secondary to airway anomalies has also risen (Hein & Rutter, 2006). Pediatric tracheotomies are performed primarily due to airway obstruction ... Article
Article  |   November 01, 2006
Pediatric Laryngotracheal Reconstruction: Case Studies
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Shannon M. Theis
    Division of Otolaryngology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Madison, WI
  • Nadine P. Connor
    Division of Otolaryngology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Madison, WI
  • J. Scott McMurray, MD
    Division of Otolaryngology, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Madison, WI
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   November 01, 2006
Pediatric Laryngotracheal Reconstruction: Case Studies
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, November 2006, Vol. 16, 20-23. doi:10.1044/vvd16.3.20
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, November 2006, Vol. 16, 20-23. doi:10.1044/vvd16.3.20
As the survival rates of critically ill children and children born prematurely continue to increase due to advances in the medical field, the number of pediatric tracheotomies being performed secondary to airway anomalies has also risen (Hein & Rutter, 2006). Pediatric tracheotomies are performed primarily due to airway obstruction secondary to congenital or acquired abnormalities or ventilatory dependence Zalzal, Choi, & Kantilal, 1997); however, the placement of a tracheostomy tube can result in speech and language delays, swallowing difficulties, and can inhibit vocalizations (Kertoy, 2002). With the development and refinement of advanced surgical techniques, such as those for laryngotracheal reconstruction, the care for children with tracheostomies has continued to evolve. Laryngotracheal reconstruction in the pediatric population has become increasingly utilized as a method of decannulating children with tracheostomies. While a thorough review of different reconstruction procedures is beyond the breadth of this article, laryngotracheal reconstruction techniques can be divided into three broad categories, which include splits, augmentations, and resections (Willging & Cotton, 1995).
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