Postlaryngectomy Rehabilitation: Multidisciplinary Literature in Postlaryngectomy Rehabilitation While the role of the speech-language pathologist clearly has a focuses on speech rehabilitation following laryngectomy, the service domain might be better described as having an emphasis on “communication” broadly defined. Yet, from a historical perspective, our own literature provides a rather narrow perspective on issues pertaining to rehabilitation. In ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 1999
Postlaryngectomy Rehabilitation: Multidisciplinary Literature in Postlaryngectomy Rehabilitation
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Philip C. Doyle
    School of Communication Sciences and Disorders The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   December 01, 1999
Postlaryngectomy Rehabilitation: Multidisciplinary Literature in Postlaryngectomy Rehabilitation
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, December 1999, Vol. 9, 3. doi:10.1044/vvd9.3.3
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, December 1999, Vol. 9, 3. doi:10.1044/vvd9.3.3
While the role of the speech-language pathologist clearly has a focuses on speech rehabilitation following laryngectomy, the service domain might be better described as having an emphasis on “communication” broadly defined. Yet, from a historical perspective, our own literature provides a rather narrow perspective on issues pertaining to rehabilitation. In this sense, we may at times find our purpose and direction restricted despite the important things we have to offer to each individual under our care. That is, clinical emphasis may at times be characterized by attention to “trees” rather than the proverbial “forest”; consequently, our professional knowledge and education often results in our desire to seek answers from within, rather than outside the profession. It is, however, almost a certainty that contemporary perspectives on cancer care in general, and perhaps the rehabilitation of those individuals who undergo laryngectomy specifically, will be enhanced if an active, conscious, and premeditated exploration of literature external to that in communication sciences and disorders is conducted. Thus, the use of multidisciplinary literature may help the speech-language pathologist to provide better and more comprehensive care to those who are treated for laryngeal cancer or laryngectomized.
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