Research Update The following solicited contributions are status reports on some current voice research projects. F. Sean. Hodge, Raymond H. Colton, and Richard Kelley, Syracuse Voice Center, Department of Otolaryngology & Communication Sciences, SUNY Health Science Center, Syracuse, NY The relationship of lung pressure, fundamental frequency, peak airflow, open quotient, and ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 1999
Research Update
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Article Information
Articles
Article   |   December 01, 1999
Research Update
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, December 1999, Vol. 9, 2-6. doi:10.1044/vvd9.3.2
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, December 1999, Vol. 9, 2-6. doi:10.1044/vvd9.3.2
The following solicited contributions are status reports on some current voice research projects.
F. Sean. Hodge, Raymond H. Colton, and Richard Kelley, Syracuse Voice Center, Department of Otolaryngology & Communication Sciences, SUNY Health Science Center, Syracuse, NY
The relationship of lung pressure, fundamental frequency, peak airflow, open quotient, and maximal flow declination rate to vocal intensity in a control group and an elderly male group was investigated. The control group consisted of 17 healthy male subjects with a mean age of 30 years and the elderly group consisted of 11 healthy male subjects with a mean age of 77 years. Data were collected at three levels of vocal intensity: soft, comfortable and loud, corresponding to 25%, 50% and 75% of dynamic range respectively. Additionally, phonational threshold pressure was determined. Lung pressure was approximated by measuring intra-oral pressure. Airflow through a vented mask was inverse filtered to provide the glottal airflow waveform and fundamental frequency, peak airflow, open quotient, and maximal flow declination rate were determined from the differentiated waveform. Excess lung pressure was calculated as lung pressure minus phonational threshold pressure. Results show an increase in sound pressure level across the conditions, with corresponding increases in lung pressure, excess lung pressure, fundamental frequency, peak airflow and maximal flow declination rate. Open quotient was noted to decrease with increasing vocal intensity. These relationships were observed for both control and elderly groups. Lung pressure, sound pressure level, and peak airflow were all found to be significantly greater for the control group than for the elderly group at each condition (p<0.05). Open quotient was found to be significantly lower for the control group than the elderly group at each condition (p<0.05). No significant difference was observed for excess lung pressure, phonational threshold pressure, fundamental frequency, or maximal flow declination rate between the two groups. These results show that a difference in vocal intensity does exist between young and elderly voices and that this difference is the result of differences in lung pressure, peak airflow and open quotient.
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