Postlaryngectomy Rehabilitation: Laryngectomy and Gender: A Need for Re-Evaluation Clinicians serving individuals diagnosed with and treated for laryngeal cancer are well aware of the myriad physical, psychological, social, and emotional sequelae. As such, clinicians are obliged to provide service to these individuals with such sequelae in mind. Care of the laryngectomized has traditionally been guided by the fact that ... Article
Article  |   August 01, 1999
Postlaryngectomy Rehabilitation: Laryngectomy and Gender: A Need for Re-Evaluation
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Philip C. Doyle
    School of Communication Sciences and Disorders, The University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario
Article Information
Article
Article   |   August 01, 1999
Postlaryngectomy Rehabilitation: Laryngectomy and Gender: A Need for Re-Evaluation
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, August 1999, Vol. 9, 3-4. doi:10.1044/vvd9.2.3
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, August 1999, Vol. 9, 3-4. doi:10.1044/vvd9.2.3
Clinicians serving individuals diagnosed with and treated for laryngeal cancer are well aware of the myriad physical, psychological, social, and emotional sequelae. As such, clinicians are obliged to provide service to these individuals with such sequelae in mind. Care of the laryngectomized has traditionally been guided by the fact that a majority of those individuals are men. Because of this bias, new issues may now require further consideration, specifically issues that may not have been viewed as a primary concern for men. We are beginning to see that the demographics of those diagnosed with laryngeal cancer are changing and with this comes a need to re-evaluate the care we provide. One prominent example is found for cancer of the larynx where incidence data over the past 50 years suggest the male:female ratio is beginning to equalize. In the 1950s, a cursory examination of male:female ratios was shown to vary from 10:1 to 7:1. Contemporary data suggest the gender ratio is now narrowing to 6:1 to 4:1. This change carries with it a new responsibility for speech-language pathologists, as well as other professional who serve this clinical population. It is now necessary for clinicians to re-evaluate laryngectomy relative to its unique impact on women.
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