Clinical Nuggets: Laryngology Pathology of the Week During a section of my graduate course in Voice Disorders, I teach the students about various organic pathologies, including etiology and typical treatments, and I show examples from stroboscopic examinations so the students begin to recognize different laryngeal pathologies. Although it is not the speech-language pathologist’s job to diagnose these ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 1999
Clinical Nuggets: Laryngology Pathology of the Week
Author Notes
Article Information
Clinical Nuggets
Article   |   April 01, 1999
Clinical Nuggets: Laryngology Pathology of the Week
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, April 1999, Vol. 9, 2-3. doi:10.1044/vvd9.1.2-a
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, April 1999, Vol. 9, 2-3. doi:10.1044/vvd9.1.2-a
During a section of my graduate course in Voice Disorders, I teach the students about various organic pathologies, including etiology and typical treatments, and I show examples from stroboscopic examinations so the students begin to recognize different laryngeal pathologies. Although it is not the speech-language pathologist’s job to diagnose these laryngeal lesions, I believe it is important for the speech-language pathologist to be able to recognize them for effective communication with ENTs and patients. I use the “Laryngeal Pathology of the Week” to help reinforce the classroom lecture and to give practice in descriptive clinical writing. At the end of each class session, I display a still photograph of an organic laryngeal pathology (e.g., polyp, nodules, cysts, etc. of various shapes, sizes, locations). Then, I hang the picture on my office door for the rest of the week. The students are required to complete a “guess slip” on which they try to name the laryngeal pathology and describe it. They sit outside my office pouring through texts trying to identify the pathology! A typical guess might be, “I think it is a sessile polyp; it is a broad-based lesion on the glottal edge of the left vocal fold extending from the anterior commisure to the junction of the medial and posterior one-third regions.” If they can’t name the lesion, then they are instructed to be very descriptive in their writing. During the subsequent week, I display the picture again and reveal the answer. Then, we discuss why it is a polyp and not nodules or a granuloma. I also explain how I would describe pathology in my stroboscopic report. They get one point for each guess slip they complete on time for a total of 10 points possible during the semester. It is a small portion of the their final grade, but it is one assignment that all of the students seem to love. The course evaluations for the past 3 years have all stated to keep this assignment as part of the course. It also helps me to get to know the students as they are stopping my office during the week to view the photo.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.