Clinical Nuggets Daniel R. Boone I like to use auditory masking as a diagnostic probe when evaluating the voice of new voice clients. As part of the voice evaluation, we ask the clients to wear headphones and read aloud as we record their voices on a tape recorder. We tell the ... Article
Article  |   December 01, 1998
Clinical Nuggets
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Article Information
Clinical Nuggets
Article   |   December 01, 1998
Clinical Nuggets
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, December 1998, Vol. 8, 3. doi:10.1044/vvd8.3.3
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, December 1998, Vol. 8, 3. doi:10.1044/vvd8.3.3
Daniel R. Boone
I like to use auditory masking as a diagnostic probe when evaluating the voice of new voice clients. As part of the voice evaluation, we ask the clients to wear headphones and read aloud as we record their voices on a tape recorder. We tell the client, “as you are reading, you will hear a rushing sound, and when you do, just continue reading as if you did not hear it.” About 30 secs into the reading, we introduce speech-range masking, one of the auditory feedback components of the Facilitator. Speech-range masking is more effective in masking out one’s ability to hear oneself at far less intensity levels than pink or white-noise masking. We continue the use of masking interspersed with no masking as the client reads aloud.
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