Professional Voice Corner: Introductory Comments I would like to make brief introductory comments to an invited article from Arthur Lessac, Emeritus Professor and ASHA Life Member. The invitation arose from considerable interest expressed among Division 3 affiliates relative to his work. As many members are aware, and without hyperbole, Professor Lessac is broadly recognized as ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 1998
Professional Voice Corner: Introductory Comments
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Katherine Verdolini
    Voice/Speech/Swallowing, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center and Brigham and Women's Hospital, Otology and Laryngology, Harvard Medical School
    Communication Sciences and Disorders, Massachusetts General Hospital Institute of Health Professions, Boston, MA
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   April 01, 1998
Professional Voice Corner: Introductory Comments
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, April 1998, Vol. 8, 14. doi:10.1044/vvd8.1.14
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, April 1998, Vol. 8, 14. doi:10.1044/vvd8.1.14
I would like to make brief introductory comments to an invited article from Arthur Lessac, Emeritus Professor and ASHA Life Member. The invitation arose from considerable interest expressed among Division 3 affiliates relative to his work. As many members are aware, and without hyperbole, Professor Lessac is broadly recognized as one of a handful of 20th Century masters in theatre voice and speech training. Over the past several decades, he has developed his own unique approach to training, based on systematic principles of both content and modality. Key elements are described in the article that follows.
In his article, Lessac uses language that may be different from the operationalized, quantitative mode of expression that is increasingly common within the speech-language pathology community. The language, together with the thoughts, are refreshing for those who are comfortable approaching the text with imagination beyond the literal reading. As a collaborator of Professor Lessac’s in prior research projects (e.g. Verdolini-Marston, Burke, Lessac, Glaze, & Caldwell, Journal of Voice, 1995) and having had the opportunity to observe his work on many occasions, I have been deeply impressed by its maturity and effectiveness. The article that follows provides a verbal description that comes to life—making substantive clinical sense—in actual therapy and training. Members are encouraged to take advantage of any hands-on training opportunities that arise in his work.
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