Use of Aerodynamic Measures in Clinical Voice Assessment Aerodynamic forces play a major role in the production of voice, so it seems reasonable that a complete clinical voice evaluation would include assessment of aerodynamic parameters. But a recent survey of voice therapists indicates that many do not have access to aerodynamic instrumentation and, even when equipment is ... Article
Article  |   November 01, 2007
Use of Aerodynamic Measures in Clinical Voice Assessment
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Daryush Mehta
    Center for Laryngeal Surgery and Voice Rehabilitation, Massachusetts General Hospital Health Sciences and Technology, Harvard-Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyBoston, MA
  • Robert E. Hillman
    Center for Laryngeal Surgery and Voice Rehabilitation, Massachusetts General Hospital Health Sciences and Technology, Harvard-Massachusetts Institute of TechnologyBoston, MA
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   November 01, 2007
Use of Aerodynamic Measures in Clinical Voice Assessment
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, November 2007, Vol. 17, 14-18. doi:10.1044/vvd17.3.14
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, November 2007, Vol. 17, 14-18. doi:10.1044/vvd17.3.14
Aerodynamic forces play a major role in the production of voice, so it seems reasonable that a complete clinical voice evaluation would include assessment of aerodynamic parameters. But a recent survey of voice therapists indicates that many do not have access to aerodynamic instrumentation and, even when equipment is available, aerodynamic assessment is not uniformly applied in the voice assessment process (Behrman, 2005). At our Center, aerodynamic assessment is a routine part of a complete voice evaluation.
The purpose of this article is to provide our perspective on the appropriate utilization of current approaches for the clinical assessment of vocal aerodynamics. Members of our group originally expressed their views on this topic as part of a publication entitled “Appropriate Use of Objective Measures of Vocal Function in the Multidisciplinary Management of Voice Disorders” (Hillman, Montgomery, & Zeitels, 1997). The current article essentially represents an updated and greatly expanded version of the sections in our original 1997 publication that were pertinent to aerodynamic assessment. This is very much a “nuts and bolts” description of how we clinically employ aerodynamic measures in a busy Voice Center. We conclude the present piece with a brief discussion of potential future developments/improvements in clinical methods for the aerodynamic assessment of vocal function. Readers seeking more complete information about the general topic of aerodynamic measurement of voice are directed to previous publications devoted entirely to a more comprehensive review of this area (Hillman, 2004; Hillman & Kobler, 2000).
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.