Perception of Dysphonic Vocal Quality: Some Thoughts and Research Update Measurement of voice quality is important for clinical assessment and rehabilitation of patients with dysphonic voices. This may be achieved through subjective or objective methods. Subjective judgments are typically obtained in the form of a clinician’s ratings of voice quality. Although these measures are easy to obtain and require ... Article
Article  |   July 01, 2007
Perception of Dysphonic Vocal Quality: Some Thoughts and Research Update
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Sona Patel
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
  • Rahul Shrivastav
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Articles
Article   |   July 01, 2007
Perception of Dysphonic Vocal Quality: Some Thoughts and Research Update
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, July 2007, Vol. 17, 3-7. doi:10.1044/vvd17.2.3
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, July 2007, Vol. 17, 3-7. doi:10.1044/vvd17.2.3
Measurement of voice quality is important for clinical assessment and rehabilitation of patients with dysphonic voices. This may be achieved through subjective or objective methods. Subjective judgments are typically obtained in the form of a clinician’s ratings of voice quality. Although these measures are easy to obtain and require little instrumentation, they suffer from poor sensitivity, reliability, and agreement across individual raters (Gerratt, Kreiman, Antonanzas-Barroso, & Berke, 1993). Objective measurements, on the other hand, have long held promise for better sensitivity and specificity in voice quality measurement, but have failed to deliver on both of these counts. The following is a brief summary of our research, which seeks to determine the mechanisms underlying the perception of voice quality and develop appropriate ways to quantify voice quality. Our goal is to develop a method to quantify voice quality that can serve as a measure of treatment outcome for individuals with voice disorders. This requires the measurement scheme to have known scale properties (e.g., ordinal vs. interval scale), a high degree of sensitivity to changes in voice quality, and a high degree of specificity to changes in the quality being assessed. Such a measure of voice quality can prove to be very useful in the assessment and treatment of patients with dysphonia.
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