Use of Stroboscopic Laryngeal Imaging in Children Visualizing the larynx is an essential component of any thorough voice evaluation. Accomplished using a transoral rigid or transnasal flexible endoscope, the dynamic image obtained provides information regarding the nature of gross laryngeal function (e.g., arytenoid mobility, true vocal fold level, glottic closure), vocal fold vibration, and the presence ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2007
Use of Stroboscopic Laryngeal Imaging in Children
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lisa Kelchner
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH
    Center for Pediatric Voice Disorders, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH
  • Barbara Weinrich
    Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, Miami University, Oxford, OH
    Center for Pediatric Voice Disorders, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH
  • Susan Baker
    Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, Miami University, Oxford, OH
    Center for Pediatric Voice Disorders, Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center, Cincinnati, OH
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Articles
Article   |   March 01, 2007
Use of Stroboscopic Laryngeal Imaging in Children
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, March 2007, Vol. 17, 8-11. doi:10.1044/vvd17.1.8
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, March 2007, Vol. 17, 8-11. doi:10.1044/vvd17.1.8
Visualizing the larynx is an essential component of any thorough voice evaluation. Accomplished using a transoral rigid or transnasal flexible endoscope, the dynamic image obtained provides information regarding the nature of gross laryngeal function (e.g., arytenoid mobility, true vocal fold level, glottic closure), vocal fold vibration, and the presence or absence of mucosal/structural abnormalities. La-ryngeal stroboscopy (digital and video) is widely used in adults to assist in the diagnosis of a voice or laryngeal disorder, and the associated merits and benefits for diagnosing and managing voice care are well documented (Behrman, 2005; Bless, Hirano, & Feder, 1987; Dejonckere et al., 2001; Wendler, 1992). However, for children with voice disorders, particularly in children under 10 years of age, the use of a digital/videostroboscopic exam to directly assist in the diagnosis and determine direction of treatment is less common.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.