Pulmonary Functioning Following Total Laryngectomy Removal of the human larynx has been considered a resolution for cancer of the vocal mechanism since the mid 1800s. Many credit Billroth of Vienna with performing, in 1873, the first total laryngectomy secondary to laryngeal carcinoma (Luchsinger & Arnold, 1965). His patient is reported to have survived over ... Article
Article  |   July 01, 2006
Pulmonary Functioning Following Total Laryngectomy
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Dennis Fuller
    St. Louis University Department of Otolaryngology St. Louis, MO
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Articles
Article   |   July 01, 2006
Pulmonary Functioning Following Total Laryngectomy
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, July 2006, Vol. 16, 9-12. doi:10.1044/vvd16.2.9
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, July 2006, Vol. 16, 9-12. doi:10.1044/vvd16.2.9
Removal of the human larynx has been considered a resolution for cancer of the vocal mechanism since the mid 1800s. Many credit Billroth of Vienna with performing, in 1873, the first total laryngectomy secondary to laryngeal carcinoma (Luchsinger & Arnold, 1965). His patient is reported to have survived over a year post cancer removal. During that time, Gussenbauer reportedly devised the first artificial larynx for a total laryngectomy for this patient. This prosthesis was based on the design of an artificial larynx created by Czech physiologist Johann Czermak (Luchsinger & Arnold). In 1859 Czermak had designed a “sound producing” prosthesis for an 18-year-old female who had suffered “closure of her larynx” and required a tracheotomy. The Czermak design was a tube that was placed over the tracheal stoma upon exhalation, which routed the pulmonary air over a metal reed and then through a hollowed rubber tube that was placed in the mouth. The user simply articulated the reed produced “artificial voice” and intelligible speech was created.
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