LPR: Impact on the Larynx, Mechanisms Involved, and Current Management Approaches The dramatic growth in public awareness of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has had a corresponding impact on physician office visits. LPR as the atypical or supra-esophageal form of GERD has a significant effect on the larynx. Multiple factors contribute to the development of LPR, and ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2006
LPR: Impact on the Larynx, Mechanisms Involved, and Current Management Approaches
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kenneth W. Altman, MD
    Department of Otolaryngology, The Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   March 01, 2006
LPR: Impact on the Larynx, Mechanisms Involved, and Current Management Approaches
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, March 2006, Vol. 16, 15-19. doi:10.1044/vvd16.1.15
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, March 2006, Vol. 16, 15-19. doi:10.1044/vvd16.1.15
The dramatic growth in public awareness of laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) has had a corresponding impact on physician office visits. LPR as the atypical or supra-esophageal form of GERD has a significant effect on the larynx. Multiple factors contribute to the development of LPR, and there is a growing body of evidence supporting its role in respiratory tract disease. Current management approaches include diet and behavior modification, pharmacologic therapy, and surgery. This article summarizes the spectrum of laryngopharyngeal reflux disease, mechanisms involved in reflux with the impact on the larynx, and presents management options.
Multiple studies have confirmed that LPR and GERD are highly prevalent in the general population, and the impact on health systems is growing dramatically. Postal surveys in the United Kingdom (Kennedy & Jones, 2000), Belgium (Louis et al., 2002), and New Zealand (Haque, Wyeth, Stace, Talley, & Green, 2000) document heartburn and regurgitation symptoms in 28.4%–45.2% of the population. In the United States, Locke, Talley, Fett, Zinsmeister, and Melton (1997)  found 20% of their questionnaire sample to have weekly heartburn and almost 60% with occasional symptoms. Similarly, Johanson (2000)  summarized occasional or monthly heartburn at 21–58%, and daily heartburn at 4–7%.
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