Voice Treatment (LSVT®) for Individuals With Parkinson Disease: New Horizons Nearly 90% of individuals with Parkinson disease (PD) have a speech or voice disorder (Logemann, Fisher, Boshes, & Blonsky, 1978), with some individuals with PD reporting changes early in the disease process. Historically, speech and voice treatment has been unsuccessful for these individuals (Sarno, 1968; Greene, 1980), with ... Article
Article  |   July 01, 2005
Voice Treatment (LSVT®) for Individuals With Parkinson Disease: New Horizons
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Cynthia Fox
    National Center for Voice and Speech of the Denver Center for the Performing Arts
  • Angela Halpern
    National Center for Voice and Speech of the Denver Center for the Performing Arts
  • Jill Petska
    National Center for Voice and Speech of the Denver Center for the Performing Arts
  • Jennifer Spielman
    National Center for Voice and Speech of the Denver Center for the Performing Arts
  • Leslie Will
    National Center for Voice and Speech of the Denver Center for the Performing Arts, Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Science, University of Colorado-Boulder
  • Lorraine Ramig
    National Center for Voice and Speech of the Denver Center for the Performing Arts, Department of Speech, Language and Hearing Science, University of Colorado-Boulder
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   July 01, 2005
Voice Treatment (LSVT®) for Individuals With Parkinson Disease: New Horizons
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, July 2005, Vol. 15, 9-16. doi:10.1044/vvd15.2.9
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, July 2005, Vol. 15, 9-16. doi:10.1044/vvd15.2.9
Nearly 90% of individuals with Parkinson disease (PD) have a speech or voice disorder (Logemann, Fisher, Boshes, & Blonsky, 1978), with some individuals with PD reporting changes early in the disease process. Historically, speech and voice treatment has been unsuccessful for these individuals (Sarno, 1968; Greene, 1980), with ongoing deterioration in communication function as the disease progresses (Sapir et al., 2001).
Challenges to successful speech treatment outcomes for individuals with PD have included the progressive nature of the disease, the systemic deterioration in multiple body systems, and a range of neuropsychological challenges to learning (Fox, Morrison, Ramig, & Sapir, 2002). Recent research studies analyzing the effects of Lee Silver Voice Treatment (LSVT®) for individuals with PD have generated the first high quality published Level I (randomized control trial) data for speech treatment in PD (Ramig et al., 2001; C. Goetz, personal communication, March 5, 2003). In a review of evidence for behavioral management of respiratory and phonatory dysfunction from dysarthria including studies of speech therapy for people with PD, Yorkston, Spencer and Duffy (2003) have concluded that “the effects of LSVT® clearly have been documented with the widest range of outcome measures of any type of treatment reviewed here. Overall the outcomes for LSVT® can be interpreted with confidence.”
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.