Instrumental Assessment of Respiratory and Laryngeal Function in Patients With Neurological Disorders Neurogenic communicative disorders, acquired or congenital, involve complex problems of movement as a result of neurological disorder or injury (Owens, Metz, & Haas, 2000). Stroke is the leading cause of neuro-genic disorders, with other causes including chronic disease, traumatic brain injury, anoxia, neoplasm, infection, and neurotoxins (Duffy, 1995; Owens ... Article
Article  |   July 01, 2005
Instrumental Assessment of Respiratory and Laryngeal Function in Patients With Neurological Disorders
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Christine M. Carmichael
    Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, University of Florida Malcom Randall VA, Brain Rehabilitation Research Center, Gainesville, FL
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   July 01, 2005
Instrumental Assessment of Respiratory and Laryngeal Function in Patients With Neurological Disorders
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, July 2005, Vol. 15, 16-20. doi:10.1044/vvd15.2.16
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, July 2005, Vol. 15, 16-20. doi:10.1044/vvd15.2.16
Neurogenic communicative disorders, acquired or congenital, involve complex problems of movement as a result of neurological disorder or injury (Owens, Metz, & Haas, 2000). Stroke is the leading cause of neuro-genic disorders, with other causes including chronic disease, traumatic brain injury, anoxia, neoplasm, infection, and neurotoxins (Duffy, 1995; Owens et al., 2000). Communicative processes of respiration, phonation, resonation, articulation, and prosody may be affected with neurogenic disorders. Sometimes referred to as “motor speech disorders,” these impairments affect planning, coordination, timing, and execution of speech. Treatment directed at teaching well-coordinated muscle movements, improving muscle strength, muscle tone, and movement accuracy is essential for those with motor speech deficits (Duffy, 1995; Rosenbek & LaPointe, 1985). Prior to treatment, motor function and pattern need proper evaluation in order to sufficiently identify deficits and establish effective intervention. Following proper diagnoses by appropriate specialists, such as neurologists or pulmonologists, instrumental procedures performed by speech-language pathologists can yield precise measurements that aid in determining the severity of impaired motor functions.
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