Laryngeal Function in Individuals With Parkinson's Disease Voice disorders occur in over 80% of individuals with Parkinson disease and are successfully evaluated and managed by a team of professionals from neurology, otolaryngology, and speech pathology. Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a common neurological disorder in the elderly which affects over 2% of people over 60 ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2005
Laryngeal Function in Individuals With Parkinson's Disease
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lorraine Ramig
    Department of Speech, Language, Hearing Science, University of Colorado, Boulder
  • Tanya Meyer, MD
    Department of Otolaryngology, St. Luke's Roosevelt Medical Center, New York, NY
  • Cynthia Fox
    National Center for Voice and Speech, Denver Center for the Performing Arts, Denver, CO
  • Andrew Blitzer, MD
    Department of Otolaryngology, St. Luke's Roosevelt Medical Center, New York, NY
  • Michele Tagliati, MD
    Department of Neurology, Mt. Sinai Medical Center, New York, NY
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   March 01, 2005
Laryngeal Function in Individuals With Parkinson's Disease
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, March 2005, Vol. 15, 9-15. doi:10.1044/vvd15.1.9
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, March 2005, Vol. 15, 9-15. doi:10.1044/vvd15.1.9
Voice disorders occur in over 80% of individuals with Parkinson disease and are successfully evaluated and managed by a team of professionals from neurology, otolaryngology, and speech pathology.
Parkinson’s disease (PD) is a common neurological disorder in the elderly which affects over 2% of people over 60 years of age worldwide. The classic clinical features of PD include (a) bradykinesia, (b) rigidity, (c) rest tremor, and (d) asymmetric onset (Fahn, 1986; Fahn, 1989; Gelb, Oliver, & Gilman, 1999). For a diagnosis of idiopathic PD (IPD) to be made, at least two of the first three symptoms should be present, with one of them being either tremor or bradykinesia, with a sustainable response to a dopaminergic medication. While IPD is most common, other neurodegen-erative disorders have parkinsonism as a feature. It is important to distinguish IPD from these atypical parkinsonisms because they have distinct neuro-pathologies, different prognoses, and different response to dopamin-ergic and surgical therapy. The so-called “Parkinson-plus” syndromes include: Multi System Atrophy (MSA), Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP), Diffuse Lewy Body disease, and Cortico basal ganglionic degeneration (CBGD). In addition, there are secondary causes of PD, which include stroke, post encephalitis, trauma (boxer’s encephalopa-thy), drugs (neuroleptics and other dopaminergic antagonists), and toxins (pesticides and designer drugs such as MPTP). The specific differential diagnosis of IPD, secondary PD or a Parkinson-Plus Syndrome depends on details of the clinical history, the neurological examination, and laboratory tests. Pathologically, PD affects many structures in central nervous system with preferential involvement of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc; Muller et al., 2001; Wenning, Ben Shlomo, Magalhaes, DAniel, & Quinn, 1995). It is generally believed that the normal balance between the antagonist neurotransmitters dopamine and acetylcholine are disturbed due to depletion of dopaminergic neurons.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.