Improving Speech in Clients Who Use Invasive Ventilation Speech-language pathologists are sometimes faced with the intriguing challenge of managing the speech of clients who use invasive ventilation (i.e., positive-pressure ventilation delivered via a tracheostomy). Such speech can be quite abnormal, with salient features that include short phrases, long pauses, variable loudness, and poor voice quality (Hoit, Shea, ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2004
Improving Speech in Clients Who Use Invasive Ventilation
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jeannette D. Hoit
    Department of Speech and Hearing Sciences, University of Arizona, Tuscon, AZ
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   March 01, 2004
Improving Speech in Clients Who Use Invasive Ventilation
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, March 2004, Vol. 14, 9-10. doi:10.1044/vvd14.1.9
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, March 2004, Vol. 14, 9-10. doi:10.1044/vvd14.1.9
Speech-language pathologists are sometimes faced with the intriguing challenge of managing the speech of clients who use invasive ventilation (i.e., positive-pressure ventilation delivered via a tracheostomy). Such speech can be quite abnormal, with salient features that include short phrases, long pauses, variable loudness, and poor voice quality (Hoit, Shea, & Banzett, 1994). To date, the most common management approach for improving the speech of these clients has been to insert a one-way (inspiratory) valve into the ventilator circuit, (note that a one-way valve can be mimicked by inserting a cork in the expiratory line or removing the expiratory valve altogether). Although one-way valves can be quite successful (Leder, 1994; Tippett & Siebens, 1995), their safety when used with invasive ventilation has been challenged (Hoit & Banzett, 2003). In an article published in the October 2003 issue of Chest (Hoit, Banzett, Lohmeier, Hixon, & Brown, 2003), safer alternatives to one-way valves were described for improving speech produced with invasive ventilation. The major findings of that study are summarized here.
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