Phonomicrosurgery for the Professional and Performing Voice Phonomicrosurgery (Zeitels, 2000a, b) in professional and performing voices has historically been approached with great trepidation and vocal-outcome data is sparse. The vocal liability of surgically disturbing the superficial lamina propria (SLP) and epithelium must be balanced with the inherent detrimental vocal effect of the lesion(s), (Zeitels, 2001c, d). ... Article
Article  |   July 01, 2003
Phonomicrosurgery for the Professional and Performing Voice
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Steven M. Zeitels
    Department of Otology and Laryngology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary
  • Robert E. Hillman
    Department of Otology and Laryngology, Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Articles
Article   |   July 01, 2003
Phonomicrosurgery for the Professional and Performing Voice
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, July 2003, Vol. 13, 5-13. doi:10.1044/vvd13.2.5
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, July 2003, Vol. 13, 5-13. doi:10.1044/vvd13.2.5
Phonomicrosurgery (Zeitels, 2000a, b) in professional and performing voices has historically been approached with great trepidation and vocal-outcome data is sparse. The vocal liability of surgically disturbing the superficial lamina propria (SLP) and epithelium must be balanced with the inherent detrimental vocal effect of the lesion(s), (Zeitels, 2001c, d). Phonomicrosur-gical resection of vocal-fold lesions in performing artists is enjoying an expanding role due to a variety of improvements in diagnostic assessment, surgical instrumentation and techniques, and specialized rehabilitation. Most of these lesions are the result of stress-induced phono-trauma and arise within the SLP. Successful management depends on prudent patient selection, careful timing and patient counseling, an ultra-precise technique, and vigorous vocal rehabilitation. Furthermore, an understanding of the vocal function and dysfunction of this high-performance population provides speech-language pathologists and surgeons who manage laryngeal problems with valuable information that he/she can extrapolate for general use in their practice.
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