The School-Based Speech-Language Pathologist's Role in the Determination of the Educational Relevance of a Voice Disorder The diagnosis and treatment of voice disorders is typically not the top priority of the school-based speech-language pathologist. Speech-language pathologists may only have one or two students with voice disorders (if any at all) on their often excessive caseloads at any given time. How does a school-based speech-language pathologist determine ... Article
Article  |   March 01, 2002
The School-Based Speech-Language Pathologist's Role in the Determination of the Educational Relevance of a Voice Disorder
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Casey Oliver
    Clark County School District, Las Vegas, NV
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / School-Based Settings / Articles
Article   |   March 01, 2002
The School-Based Speech-Language Pathologist's Role in the Determination of the Educational Relevance of a Voice Disorder
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, March 2002, Vol. 12, 27-29. doi:10.1044/vvd12.1.27
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, March 2002, Vol. 12, 27-29. doi:10.1044/vvd12.1.27
The diagnosis and treatment of voice disorders is typically not the top priority of the school-based speech-language pathologist. Speech-language pathologists may only have one or two students with voice disorders (if any at all) on their often excessive caseloads at any given time. How does a school-based speech-language pathologist determine if a student’s voice problem or disorder impacts educational performance? How can a voice disorder impact a student’s performance in the classroom? What is the speech-language pathologist’s role when a student’s voice disorder does not appear to have an educational impact?
Depending upon the etiology and severity of the voice disorder, the educational impact will vary. The educational impact can be academic, social, or emotional. For example, the student may not be able to orally participate in the classroom, which could affect a classroom participation grade. Perhaps there is no direct academic effect, but the student is hesitant to speak during class or to socialize with other students because he or she is ashamed or embarrassed by the sound of his or her voice. Teachers typically refer students with obvious voice problems to the speech-language pathologist, particularly when the student is difficult to understand or if the student’s voice is just unusual.
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