Postlaryngectomy Rehabilitation: Communication Disorders and Head and Neck Cancer: Are We Neglecting Education and Research? Over the past year, I have had the opportunity to provide a brief column addressing issues related to communication, as well as other problems associated with treatment for head and neck cancer with a particular emphasis on laryngeal cancer. However, while it was often necessary to discuss the myriad ... Article
Article  |   April 01, 2000
Postlaryngectomy Rehabilitation: Communication Disorders and Head and Neck Cancer: Are We Neglecting Education and Research?
Author Notes
Article Information
Articles
Article   |   April 01, 2000
Postlaryngectomy Rehabilitation: Communication Disorders and Head and Neck Cancer: Are We Neglecting Education and Research?
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, April 2000, Vol. 10, 6-8. doi:10.1044/vvd10.1.6
SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders, April 2000, Vol. 10, 6-8. doi:10.1044/vvd10.1.6
Over the past year, I have had the opportunity to provide a brief column addressing issues related to communication, as well as other problems associated with treatment for head and neck cancer with a particular emphasis on laryngeal cancer. However, while it was often necessary to discuss the myriad issues raised within the context of “communication,” in hindsight, much of the content addressed topics some might consider peripheral to communication. Topics presented previously included the need to acknowledge that postlaryngectomy rehabilitation is inadequate if speech re-acquisition is the only criterion considered. It was suggested that a more comprehensive view of the person under our care is essential if “successful” rehabilitation outcomes are to be achieved. The importance of examining demographic data relative to changing malerfemale incidence ratios over the past 5 decades also was outlined previously. Finally, I discussed what I believe is a rather essential need for speech-language pathologists to carefully examine the literature of other disciplines relative to our own work. All-in-all, these broad topics of presentation were all outgrowths of my own attempt to assess why education and ongoing research in this important clinical area is diminishing.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Become a SIG Affiliate
Pay Per View
Entire SIG 3 Perspectives on Voice and Voice Disorders content & archive
24-hour access
This Issue
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access
We've Changed Our Publication Model...
The 19 individual SIG Perspectives publications have been relaunched as the new, all-in-one Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups.